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Forbes recently ran a piece for International Women’s Day on eight women who it believes are leaders in the field of cannabis. The people were picked because they created something out of nothing. They range from CEOs to people trying to teach people how to build successful cannabis businesses with a program partnered with Oaksterdam University and Hood Incubator.

Key Takeaways:

  • Forbes recently ran a piece on 8 women who are leaders in the cannabis industry.
  • The list included: Julia Jacobson of Aster Farms, Liz Jackson-Simpson and Angela White of Success Centers SF, Chrissy Hadar of Oregrown Industries, Marie Montarquet of MD Farms, Shelby Hartman and Madison Margolin of DoubleBlind, Sally Nichols of GirlVentures and Bloom Farm Distribution/Bloom Farms CBD.
  • The author says they were selected because they created something out of nothing.

Quote: “In honor of this day, even if I am a day late, I’m lucky to be able to share the enthusiasm and verve of the following women in cannabis who have faced adversity during their climb to success.” (Bobrow, 2020)

Link to article:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/warrenbobrow/2020/03/09/international-womens-day-celebrate-eight-female-leaders-in-cannabis-2020/#4daa7f5332b1

Canopy Growth Corporation was forced to announce cost-cutting measures in order to reach profitability. The company will release 500 jobs and close two facilities. It is another one of the publicly traded growing companies to do so. The market has been down because supply has out-paced demand also dispensaries have not opened as quickly as most thought they would.

Key Takeaways:
The cannabis industry in Canada and in the US continues to reel as another one of the publicly traded firms announced cost-cutting measures.
Canopy Growth Corporation announced the closing of two facilities and that they would cut 500 jobs.
CEO, David Klein, said that the move was to help focus on, “aligning resources to the needs of our consumers.”

Quote: “After the market closed Wednesday, Canada’s Canopy Growth Corporation (TSX:WEED, NYSE: CGC), the world’s largest cannabis company by market cap, announced plans to shutter two cultivation facilities and cut 500 jobs. ” (Furnari, 2020)

Link to article:
https://thcnet.com/news/canopy-growth-to-shutter-2-indoor-growing-facilities-cut-500-jobs

Indoor gardening and urban indoor farming methods are still facing the power consumption problem. Australia is a place where the marijuana industry is new. They are not sure how much power is being consumed there making the product. They are also unsure how much of it is legal and how much is illegal.

Key Takeaways:

  • The article mentions that Australia has no idea how big the power draw is from producing marijuana.
  • They cannot specifically place the power draw just on marijuana either because people have started to grow crops indoors as well.
  • Australia is struggling to keep up while also moving toward renewable energy sources at the same time.

Quote: “There is no data on how much power cannabis growers in Australia are using. The only estimate is from a Deloitte Access Economics study from 2016, which placed indoor cultivation electricity consumption at $8.9m a year across the industry which had 2,291sqm under cultivation.” (Williamson, 2020)

Link to article:
https://stockhead.com.au/food-agriculture/indoor-farming-is-great-until-the-power-bill-is-delivered/

The sustainability of cannabis growth comes into question again because of the amount of energy consumed in order to make it. Rules and taxes have been made to encourage cannabis growers to find ways of generating their own power. However, an organization, Resource Innovation Institute is holding a conference to talk about it called the Agriculture Energy Solutions Conference.

Key Takeaways:

  • A group of leaders within the cannabis industry is meeting together in San Diego to talk about how to stem the use of power as it relates to producing cannabis.
  • Energy consumption from the production of the plant has been high which has caused taxes and other incentives to try to get companies to produce their own power.
  • Several people are scheduled to speak on a wide range of topics within the cannabis industry as well as the power consumption problem.

Quote: “Key considerations are the carbon and energy implications of indoor controlled environments. Drawing from the experiences of early models, the conference objective was to explore energy solutions for all forms of indoor agriculture but a core focus for good reason was on the exponentially growing cannabis sector and the implications of increased energy demands and use.” (Miller, 2020)

Link to article:
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/global-warming-meets-indoor-agriculture-162526718.html

The profitability and business plans of many Cannabis-based businesses being traded on the open market have been tested in the last year. Many of them are down and many of them are struggling to find profit. However, there have been 2 that have not lost as much and they, recently, got the buy recommendation from a Yahoo finance writer, TipRanks. However, the article mentions that Coronavirus could affect the industry because much of the cheap or budget-friendly equipment comes from China.

Key Takeaways:
The volatility of the Cannabis market on the open trading exchanges has continued into the new year as companies and their management are being tested by the marketplace conditions.
The article mentions that concerns about the Coronavirus will likely affect the Cannabis industry as well because some companies use the budget-friendly gear from China.
TipRanks, the writer of the article, still recommended two stocks to buy in the Cannabis industry despite the volatility and concerns about the Coronavirus.

Quote: “Is the bottom in yet for the beleaguered cannabis industry or can it actually drop any further? This is a question that has come up repeatedly over the last few months. Following several years of dramatic expansion, the sector’s upward curve came to a grinding halt last year.” (TipRanks, 2020)

Link to article:

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/analyst-2-high-quality-cannabis-185247319.html


A planning board in Hatfield is planning to make amendments to its zoning ordinances for marijuana production. Cronin Hill and Depot residents were worried about a 6.8-acre development being spearheaded by a company named Urban Grown Inc. It brought to light that it might have to make changes such as the proposed zoning ordinance changes.

Key Takeaways:

  • A planning board in Hatfield has a plan to place restrictions on how close marijuana crops can be grown in residential zones.
  • The zoning amendment says that no marijuana can be grown within 500 ft of a pre-existing residential use, not in the same lot.
  • The plan came together because of a grower’s plan to use a 6.8-acre area that was near Depot and Cronin Hill. The residents had concerns about the development for various reasons not cited in the article.
  • Quote: “The bylaw changes wouldn’t affect the indoor grow category, which is allowed in business, industrial and light industrial zones. It also doesn’t prohibit a farmer or an employee from living at a dwelling on site that is next to the crops. ” (Merzbach, 2020)

    Link to article:

    https://www.gazettenet.com/Hatfield-considers-changes-to-marijuana-growing-bylaw-32817565

Investors, understandably, have been gun shy since the cannabis investment market has been full of disappointments. However, there are four companies that are in the industry or adjacent to it that are still solid stocks according to the article. They include Innovative Industrial Properties Inc, Scott’s Miracle-Gro, PerkinElmer, and The Cannabis ETF. Most of these companies gave out a dividend or increased in value.

Key Takeaway:

  • 2019 was a hard year for cannabis investors as several companies made bad decisions which turned investments sour.
  • People still want to be involved in the industry and the article recommends investors to get stocks with dividends.
  • The four companies that article focuses on are Innovative Industrial Properties Inc, Scott’s Miracle-Gro, PerkinElmer, and The Cannabis ETF.

“A small group of cannabis stocks actually pays dividends. So, investors can earn some money while they are waiting for the industry to recover.”(Borchardt, 2020)

Link to article:

https://realmoney.thestreet.com/investing/stocks/grow-some-green-dividends-as-cannabis-stock-recovery-drags-on-15242267

A fire that burned a downtown Eugene building was allegedly caused by an enthusiast of marijuana making hash oil. It is illegal to use butane to extract cannabis. It is legal if the person has a license from the OLCC as a recreational processor. They also have to be licensed by OHA specifically as a medical processor with the state.

Key Takeaways:

  • A man allegedly attempted to make hash oil.
  • The attempt may have caused a building in downtown Eugene to catch fire.
  • There are other ways of extraction that are safer and should have been used instead.

“Over the years, there have been many hash oil incidents that have led to serious injuries. In 2017, Eric Scully was sentenced to seven years in prison for setting a storage facility on fire when he was making butane hash oil.” (Dendy, 2020)

Link to article:

https://www.kezi.com/content/news/Dispensary-owner-provides-insight-about-hash-oil-567957551.html

Veterinarians are worried about the toxicity of cannabis edibles in pets. They are not worried about the cannabis but the ingredients that go with the edibles. They are noting that cannabis edibles often come with chocolate, raisins, and other things like xylitol. The mixture could be very bad for pets when mixed together. They note that the cases of exposure and poisoning from cannabis edibles as quadrupled in the United States.

Key Takeaways:

  • Some veterinarians are worried about the possibility of exposure of pets to edible cannabis.
  • They cite that the reports of poisoning from cannabis edibles have quadrupled.
  • The mixture of things like chocolate, raisins, and other toxic ingredients for dogs seem to be the problem as opposed to the cannabis itself.

“Over the past six years, the U.S.-based Pet Poison Helpline says cannabis toxicity cases have more than quadrupled in the U.S. In Canada, the helpline reported there were 54 reports of pet exposure to CBD and cannabis during the first seven months of 2019.” (Geary, 2020)

Link to article:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/cannabis-pets-vet-advice-1.5464578

New farmers who are growing hemp or making CBD are thinking about making the switch should the state legalize Marijuana. It would not be too big of a step for most but, surprisingly, not everyone is on board as some want to stay building something everyone can use. The projected 30.3 billion in legalized marijuana sales may convince them otherwise, however.

Key Takeaways:

  • Farmers in New York are eyeing the possibility of growing marijuana should it go legal.
  • Some are balking at it because they want to produce a crop that will not get anyone high.
  • A major problem seems to be the taxes associated with it in the proposed bill. A farmer says that it would be akin to asking for $500 a pound.

Quote: “Some farmers, such as Sherman, are already growing hemp and wouldn’t need to change much to begin processing marijuana as well, but find the current law could hinder smaller farm operations from getting into the market.” (Briere and Dunn, 2020)

Link to article:

https://poststar.com/news/state-and-regional/farmers-mull-growing-marijuana-as-potential-for-market-grows/article_02f9663c-0046-5eaf-89d6-ea5dc4fd7086.html