The coronavirus pandemic has exposed issues within our global food supply chain. Therefore, local agriculture has emerged as viable solution to combat these issues. Not only is the food produced by these farms sustainable and delicious, but since it’s they are grown nearby to where it’s sold, the transportation costs are reduced. Since the pandemic began, the demand for locally grown produce has skyrocketed and many local farms are taking advantage of this boom by providing delivery of their produce directly to consumers.

Key Takeaways:

  • The coronavirus pandemic has exposed several issues within the agricultural industry and educated consumers about the farm-to-table process.
  • Local farming is a more sustainable and cost-effective ways for customers to by their produce because there is less transportation cost.
  • Many local farmers have gotten creative with their business and have provided direct-to-door delivery service during the pandemic.

“When the national and international food supply chains threatened to break down in early spring, local farms offered the kind of security and certainty that many people craved.”

Read more: https://communitynews.org/2020/06/19/pandemic-drives-home-the-value-of-local-natural-sustainable-farms/

The coronavirus has exposed many of the issues involved in our global food supply chain. One fix for these issues is the use of indoor, vertical farming. Companies like Intelligent Growth Solutions in Scotland are using this technique to grow produce closer to its consumers. During the pandemic they have been delivering food packages to locals, even shipping directly to elderly customers who may not have the means to get to the supermarket. This new food delivery process has greatly benefited the community of Dundee, and similar programs are likely to sprout up in the future.

Key Takeaways:

  • Vertical farms have played in essential role in the food supply chain during the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Companies like Intelligent Growth Solutions in Scotland have been able to provide produce and support for local communities.
  • The company has developed a program to deliver fresh greens directly to elderly residents who may not have the means to go to the supermarket.

“The firm worked with Dundee City Council and local charities to help get the food to the people who needed it most.”

Read more: https://www.thecourier.co.uk/fp/news/local/dundee/1379807/dundee-community-groups-lend-a-helping-hand-during-coronavirus-pandemic/

GrowGeneration has completed this week a purchase of H2O Hydroponics assets. The corporation is the largest national chain of specialized garden centers focusing on organic growth and hydroponics, with 27 store locations. The newest acquisition will allow GrowGeneration to open a location in Lansing, which will in addition to retail operations serve also as a fulfillment center. This expansion will create new jobs in the industry, which in Michigan alone already employs over 13,500 people directly with an almost half-a-billion total revenue for state in combined taxes.

Key Takeaways:

  • Grow generation is planning on purchasing hydroponics and opening up another location to make it possible.
  • The supply chain for this type of growing has grown significantly in recent years.
  • There will be locations all over, including in Michigan, Michigan was only the tenth state to legalize marijuana.

“In November 2018, Michigan became the tenth state to legalize cannabis for adults and the first state to do so in the Midwest.”

Read more: https://www.gardencentermag.com/article/growgeneration-purchases-all-assets-of-h20-hydroponics/

Since many citizens are confined to their homes from social distancing and isolation policies due to the coronavirus, many of them have taken a keen interest in indoor gardening. Also, since plant nurseries were deemed essential businesses, consumers were able to purchase plants and fixtures for their living spaces during the pandemic. These houseplants are not only beautiful to look at, but the process of gardening is relaxing and therapeutic, which is what many of us need during these trying times.

Key Takeaways:

  • Since more people are spending time at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, they have become more interested in the idea of indoor gardening.
  • Plant nurseries were deemed essential businesses, so people were able to purchase plants despite the economic shutdown.
  • Gardening itself is a relaxing and therapeutic activity, which is what people need now more than ever.

“We switched to online selling since we couldn’t have our brick and mortar location open. We didn’t really know what to expect. We have actually exceeded most of our goals, what we would’ve been making if we were physically open during this time.”

Read more: https://www.courierpostonline.com/story/life/2020/06/22/going-green-indoors-covid-19-crisis-has-us-longing-more-plants/5334720002/

Instead of buying herbs from the supermarket, a much fresher and safer way to get herbs is to simply plant them yourself. When planting herbs, it’s important to do research as each specific herb requires a different amount of water and sunlight each day. Most herbs will thrive with packaged potting soil as this soil allows for great drainage and is very lightweight. You typically want to plant these herbs in pots or containers. After they have finished growing, snip them off, chop them up and apply to your food.

Key Takeaways:

  • Using package potting soil is best for herbs because this soil is lightweight and drains well which is essential for herbs.
  • Herbs need different amounts of water, so it’s important to do research before planting them. Not all herbs require the same amount.
  • You can grow herbs indoors or outdoors and after they sprout you can use them to make your food taste much better.

““It’s more cost effective to grow herbs for yourself,” Edmunds said. “The precut herbs in plastic clamshells get expensive. And you can get multiple meals out of a single plant for much less cost than purchasing them.””

Read more: https://newportnewstimes.com/article/from-pot-to-table-easy-indoor-herbs-spice-up-cooking

An innovative teenager in Dubai is putting his scuba diving skills to good use by cleaning up the ocean. Akshansh Khrodia has created a new lift-bag to remove trash from the sea-floor. The bag itself is constructed from a waste sack, old shoelaces, and a carabiner hook. It functions better as well, if not better than other lift-bags, but is much less expensive to create and can even hold 15 kg of garbage at a time. The teenager hopes his homemade invention inspires other to keep our oceans clean.

Key Takeaways:

  • A Dubai teenager is using his scuba diving skills to help clean up the ocean.
  • He created a new sustainable and efficient mechanism that helps to remove garbage from the sea-bed.
  • The innovative bag is crafted from a large waste sack, old shoelaces, and a simple carabiner hook.

“While they operate in the same manner, these lift-bags are much harder to control due to their size and buoyancy and are not easily foldable.”

Read more: https://www.khaleejtimes.com/uae/dubai/teen-scuba-diver-creates-sustainable-bag-to-lift-trash-from-seabed

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed several issues in our agriculture supply chain industry. Many experts believe the future of agriculture will rely on vertical farming. This process is cheaper and more efficient as it uses less space, and the produce is grown closer to consumers, reducing the transportation costs. Companies like Local Leaf have been addressing these challenges with their sustainable vertical farms. Their customers have more knowledge and traceability of the growing process, from farm to table. In the future, expect to see the vertical farming industry boom.

Key Takeaways:

  • The COVID-19 pandemic is shifting the agriculture industry from traditional farming toward indoor, vertical farming.
  • Companies and investors had been pouring money into the vertical farming industry as the number of these facilities are expected to grow rapidly in the next decade.
  • Vertical farming reduces the need for any migrant labor, which allows for better health and safety outcomes.

“Local Leaf also offers a fully traceable food source, with instant access to information about the food from seed to shelf.”

Read more: https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/is-vertical-farming-the-post-covid-future-of-food-production–867466936.html

A recent study has shown that the only way our agriculture industry can be viable is to reduce overconsumption. The societal influence of growth and affluence within farming has often been overlooked, but scientists believe that it’s vital for sustainability. Although new technologies are aimed at increasing biodiversity and combatting climate change, humans are still the key factor to fix the issues within our environment. People who are of higher income need to do more to fight global warming, and as a society, we need to have a major overhaul on consumption.

Key Takeaways:

  • Sustainability is hard to achieve if the current trends in over-consumption continue. We need to converse if we want to change the course of things.
  • We hope this evidence shows that humans don’t need to dominate nature in order for us to survive. We have to take care of the earth.
  • Most of our sustainability problems come from people who have privileged. They tend to be less concerned with the affects of what they do.

“Any transition towards a sustainable world can only be effective if societal changes complement technological advancements, according to a new study.”

Read more: https://www.zmescience.com/science/overconsumption-is-the-bane-of-sustainability-new-study-concludes/

The House Bill 3412 was passed and is being dubbed the Integrated “Urban Agriculture Act”. This act aims to turn unused space in urban areas into community farming centers in a bid to address food security issues. The Covid-19 pandemic has been rough for everyone but these farming initiatives are seeing a leap in innovation. The bill is encouraging vertical farming and hydroponic farming for cultivating A-grade crops without having to have the risks and use of resources associated with ordinary soil farming.

Key Takeaways:

  • Authored by Rep. Jose Francisco Benitez, HB 3412 attempts to address food security problems that have impacted the country.
  • At least 2.5 million families experienced involuntary hunger at some point during a three month period.
  • The bill encourages vertical farming, the practice of growing produce in stacked layers indoors.

“The proposed urban gardening sites will cover idle or abandoned government or private lands, urban spaces in all urban, peri-urban and urbanizable areas.”

Read more: https://news.mb.com.ph/2020/06/17/urban-agriculture-bill-approved-by-house-panel/

There are many different things that we can do to help keep our plants healthy after this lockdown ends. Since we will have less time, it’s important to choose a plant thats easy to care for and doesn’t need to much attention. It is also essential to understand how much water your plants need because if you overhydrate them, it will prevent growth and hurt the plants roots. Finally, make sure that your plants are getting enough sunlight and do research on the best living environment for each specific plant.

Key Takeaways:

  • Make sure your plants are getting the proper amount of water. If you overwater your plants you can prevent growth.
  • Make sure your home temperature has enough humidity in order to help your plants not dry up which will turn them brown.
  • Move your plants away from windows which will help reduce photosynthesis and therefore require less moisture.

“Reports show that younger generations are responsible for the increased interest in indoor plants, as figures show that 75 per cent of 16-24 year olds are now houseplant owners.”

Read more: https://www.sussexexpress.co.uk/lifestyle/homes-and-gardens/how-keep-your-houseplant-healthy-after-lockdown-2888547