Keeping the food that we grow safe as well as keeping the environment safe at the same time is a challenge. The more we use to grow the crops the more we are harming the environment. There are many bugs that have come to be because of climate change that we are trying to combat against. The bugs that are showing up now are some that have never been seen before, and we need to figure out a way to have fewer disturbances.

Key Takeaways:

  • Crop protection has come a long way since the book Silent Spring; today’s products are safer for human health and the environment.
  • Many of today’s crop protection products are obtained from natural sources and used to grow organic produce.
  • Enabling more food to be grown per unit of land reduces human encroachment into areas such as the Amazon rainforest.

“Dangers in the food supply can occur at any stage of the farm-to-fork process.”

Read more: https://www.syngenta.com/grow-it-safe-sound-agricultural-practices-ensure-safe-and-sustainable-food-supply

Vertical farming allows for produce growth in urban areas. Not only does this cut down on transportation costs, but gives growers a chance to farm year-round. The use of vertical farms frees up space on traditional farms, which use tons of soil, and helps re-establish biodiversity. With the use of artificial intelligence, vertical farming is booming as there is a lot less need for manual labor. The plants themselves also benefit, as the environmental stress factors of a traditional farm are gone, producing higher yields.

Key Takeaways:

  • Vertical farming uses controlled light and temperature conditions and requires no soil and little water.
  • The cultivation of crops requires flexible production structures that benefit from the use of AI.
  • Controlling wind ventilation and light wavelengths can determine the size and shape of plants.

“This would eliminate transportation routes and return soils back to nature, thus promoting biodiversity.”

Read more: https://innovationorigins.com/vertical-farming-could-bring-vegetable-production-to-urban-centers/

Hydroponic farming is a revolutionary way of farming, allowing farmers to grow food without the assistance of soil and natural light. They do this by planting their crops in blocks of perlite or rockwool, and utilizing artificial lighting as opposed to natural lighting. The goal was to initial reduce the prevalence of hunger and related food shortages, but now families are actually financially supporting themselves through the hydroponic farming process by selling the produce they’ve grown.

Key Takeaways:

  • During a trip to Sweden, Ugandan Amon Makihako fell in love with the idea of hydroponic gardening.
  • Makihako’s organization made hydroponic equipment more available and offered training on its operation.
  • Aquaponic, aeroponic and vegetable systems are the major categories within hydroponic farming.

“It enables people to grow food without soil and natural light”

Read more: https://chimpreports.com/hydroponic-farming-a-hidden-solution-for-the-vulnerable-urban-poor/

Experts predict that within the next 10 to 15 years, vertical farming will be the dominant form of agriculture. Given that trends within the last of 5 years indicate an exponential increase in vertical farming, this prediction seems to be accurate. Vertical farming has many advantages, such as increased global production of food, low cost, and high quality products. Now more than ever and due to the coronavirus pandemic, vertical farming is even thought to attract many people and organizations such as governments and investors.

Key Takeaways:

  • A recent webinar suggested that vertical farming will become more ubiquitous in the future.
  • Some experts believe that technology has finally reached the point where it can support the dreams of past visionaries.
  • The coronavirus pandemic has shown how important government and investor support is to the future of farming.

“Of course the elephant in the room wasn’t ignored by the panel. COVID-19 has had an impact on all industries, and vertical farms are no exception.”

Read more: https://www.hortidaily.com/article/9222334/the-road-ahead-for-vertical-farming/

Controlled environment agriculture (CEA) is crop production within an enclosed structure, and it is growing fast in the US. CEA includes vertical farming, the market for which is projected to reach $3 billion by 2024. CEA requires fewer chemicals, a smaller growing area, and less water than traditional farming. Its lone ecological drawback is energy usage, lighting in particular. Right now, legal marijuana cultivation in the US consumes enough electricity to power over 90,000 homes. In response, the non-profit DesignLights Consortium is trying to incentivize high performance, efficient lighting, including the widespread adoption of commercial LED grow lights.

Key Takeaways:

  • In less than two decades approximately 10 million acres of U.S. farmland has been lost to development.
  • With so much acreage lost to other uses, the face of U.S. agriculture is changing. Crops are being grown in stacked layers, within enclosed structures.
  • This concept, known as Controlled Environment Agriculture, is a profitable system, projected to reach a 3 billion share within the next five years.

“Acknowledging that biggest culprit in this equation is the intense lighting needed for effective indoor horticulture, the DOE report referenced above stated that switching to all light-emitting diode (LED) technology could reduce electricity usage in the vertical farming sector alone by 40 percent, saving approximately $240 million”

Read more: https://emagazine.com/greener-lights-for-green-growers/

Poughkeepsie-based Farmers & Chefs likes to showcase the freshest produce of the region through its food trucks and brick-and-mortar restaurant. Owner John Lekic has recently taken to growing his own vegetables and herbs using a shipping container growing system bought from an Israeli company. The vertical garden is climate controlled and uses automated watering. The system requires 90 percent less water than traditional farming, and no pesticides are needed. Currently, Lekic is growing kale, lettuce, thyme, arugula, sage and dill.

Key Takeaways:

  • For one chef who wanted to grow his own food, vertical farming was the solution.
  • A shipping container in a parking lot can grow food in up to eight different areas.
  • The vertical farm grows food faster, requires less water, and can grow year-round.

“Short on space in the small parking lot behind the Farmers and Chefs building, which already holds the two food trucks, it occurred to Lekic that the only way to grow was up.”

Read more: https://www.chronogram.com/hudsonvalley/farmers-and-chefs-takes-farm-fresh-to-new-heights-with-vertical-gardens/Content?oid=10707137

One student at Arizona State University created a new food growing system, which completely skips the farm process of food growing. This system is called a vertical farm, and is so small that it can sit in the corner of a grocery store. This system reduces food waste, and can process over 2,000 pounds of food waste per day. Growing food in this space could work virtually anywhere on the globe, thus saving a ton of resources for future generations.

Key Takeaways:

  • A chemist has created a system where you can grow food in a vertical setup with a very small footprint.
  • It uses clean technology and produces the same amount of lettuce as a much larger farm.
  • The system can also help reduce waste by taking waste and using it to grow plants.

“In a time when grocery stores are struggling to keep shelves full, Chen’s vertical farm could sit in the corner of a market parking lot, sending lettuce grown from a completely organic closed system to the shelves in as little as three weeks.”

Read more: https://asunow.asu.edu/20200407-solutions-growing-welcome-vertical-farming

A Texas A&M student named Broch Saxton has built a vertical hydroponic growhouse. This invention should help people learn to have greater access to quality food. This allows more room for the crops without having to use traditional resources. Saxton has partnered with University Professor Ms. Templin to get a $60,000 grant to build this greenhouse which will help feed students while also being a tool for learning. This is something they envision they could bring to developing countries to help feed many more.

Key Takeaways:

  • Templin and Saxton envisioned a project that could feed Aggie students and staff on campus.
  • Using the grant funds, they purchased towers and a closed-loop watering system that provides nutrition to the plants.
  • The produce harvested by TUFU is distributed by the 12th Can Food Pantry, a student-run program on the Texas A&M campus.

“I want to help people have better access to greater food, all while ingraining hydroponic farming into the university.”

Read more: https://today.tamu.edu/2020/03/10/the-future-of-farming-straight-up/

Chew Jo Han, a former fashion industry professional, created a hydroponic growing system in his office. The small vertical farm used artificial light to grow food. One of this man’s friends took it upon himself to grow an indoor farm as well using balcony and bathroom space to make room for hydroponic plants. Both men found that one road block to growth was the expense of fertilizer. They established CityFarm Malaysia in 2016 to allow for more growth of vertical farming in the country and region.

Key Takeaways:

  • Jayden Koay used his balcony and bathtub for his hydroponic planting system.
  • CityFarm Malaysia was founded in 2016 to make materials available to urban farmers.
  • The company’s sales were impressive, and in 2017 they were invited to join a UN program in Kuala Lumpur.

“the industry was still in its infancy and materials, equipment like hydroponic fertilizers had to be bought from countries like Japan, Singapore, China and Taiwan. And, they were expensive.”

Read more: https://www.hortidaily.com/article/9196727/engineers-believe-vertical-farming-offers-the-answer-to-food-sustainability/

Climate change impacts all of us, but it especially affects those that are in the business of agriculture. Climate change is a threat to the health of fruits and vegetables as well as the soil, the change in climate keeps evolving. Farmers are accustomed to change and can normally adjust to it, but the way it’s going is a huge threat to the health of the soil. A lot of farmers are discovering ways to improve the health of the soil where the foods can grow.

Key Takeaways:

  • Of all the various industries that impact climate change and are highly impacted by it, the agricultural sector is right at the front lines.
  • Farmers as a group tend to believe that moving towards creating a family-friendly affordable sustainable food supply is a major step in fighting climate change.
  • Part of this process of moving towards sustainability includes improving soil health and organic soil matter.

“We must act now to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, change to a renewable energy system and advance a multitude of solutions, including the unique and important climate solutions offered by agriculture.”

Read more: https://peoplesworld.org/article/farmers-say-fight-climate-change-by-investing-in-sustainable-family-agriculture/