Although almost 90% of food in the United Arab Emirates is imported, grocery stores and supermarkets were mostly completely stocked during the pandemic. Few factors are responsible for this success, with food security led by innovation being the most important one. Integrated logistics and streamlined supply chain are critical in ensuring uninterrupted access to food source. These strategic initiatives stem from concerted effort to create economy based on innovation and knowledge. As a result, Dubai is a regional leader in early adoption of new technology in food production, overcoming scarcity of water and soil. Non-conventional methods and implementation of artificial intelligence are now common sights in the UAE’s food supply system.

Key Takeaways:

  • Technological advances have allowed the rise of non-traditional food production such as hydroponics and aquaponics. This comes as a demand for local and sustainable has increased.
  • In 2018, the UAE were ranked 31 on the index. Now we are considered joint-21 with Japan.
  • The rise in technology advancements such as artificial intelligence has shown a profound impact on food production all around the world.

“Food systems are ripe for disruption, and Dubai is leading the way regionally regarding the adoption of technology-enabled food production.”

Read more: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/351958

Elizabeth Okullow, age 24, is the CEO of a company that uses hydroponic gardening to grow organic vegetables. Okullow says she was inspired by the book The Power of Your Subconscious Mind. It occurred to her that she had a way with plants, so she began researching agricultural opportunities in Kenya. Okullow wanted to become an entrepreneur, and one day, she quit her job and set out to start her own business. She says a lot of people don’t believe her when she tells them she’s a farmer, but Okullow sees great potential in affordable hydroponic systems.

Key Takeaways:

  • Elizabeth realized that she had a love for plants when she began collecting local herbs in bushes.
  • Elizabeth is now the co-founder of a company that engages in Hydroponic farming.
  • Elizabeth was not originally looking for jobs, but instead, she wanted to find opportunities to run a business.

“During those hard times when I was still mourning my loss, I read a book titled The Power of Your Subconscious Mind by Joseph Murphy.”

Read more: http://nairobiwire.com/2020/06/meet-hydroponic-farmer-and-ceo-of-lafamia-greens-elizabeth-okullow.html

An east London car park has started to use shipping containers to grow food hydroponically. This has come as a need for sustainable food coming after the Covid-19 pandemic. These containers allow food to be cultivated without the need for soil. This is a relatively inexpensive way to provide healthy food without having to use as much water and resources as typically needed. The future is here and it’s looking quite ripe. The food is free of pesticides and subjectively tastes better.

Key Takeaways:

  • Hydroponic vegetables are grown in nutrient-enhanced water rather than soil.
  • Hydroponic vegetables can include kale, various lettuces, basil, and others, and the technology is continuing to evolve.
  • Hydroponics systems allow vegetables to be grown indoors, and for far less water, than traditional techniques.

“In the era of climate change and Brexit, British farming is facing unprecedented challenges.”

Read more: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/06/20/shipping-container-farms-come-london-growers-ditch-soil/

FFA organization in Ohio is distributing funds through its local chapters to provide foundation for building sustainable programs. The grant funds community development initiatives that primarily benefit farmers with low income. The impact is felt through improvement in quality of life and local economy. The topics extend from educational outreach to economic improvement. This year, twelve Ohio chapters have received funding for projects to be completed in the second half of this year. Depending on the impact of Covid-19, projects may be modified to better suit local community.

Key Takeaways:

  • Allen East FFA will use its ARCOP grant to teach students about food production through the Aerogrow Gardens system.
  • Hillsboro FFA members will provide clothing to economically disadvantaged families during the Christmas season.
  • Spencerville FFA in Allen County is working with elementary students to grow vegetables and is delivering food lessons to second graders.

“Originally introduced in 2013, ARCOP grants allow Ohio FFA chapters to apply for funding that aid community development projects.”

Read more: https://www.ocj.com/2020/06/ohio-ffa-chapters-receive-grants-for-local-communities/

Sachin Darbarwar is the Founder and CEO of Simply Fresh Private Limited, a business that combines sustainable farming practices with modern technology. Simply Fresh grows plants hydroponically without soil or harmful pesticides. The company relies on AI for various tasks, such as controlling greenhouse temperatures and measuring plant nutrient requirements. Darbarwar says technology allows them to reduce their human labor needs by up to a third. Darbarwar sees AI and technology as playing a significant role in the future of agriculture.

Key Takeaways:

  • The owner of Simply Fresh combines knowledge of IT and agriculture for a strong viewpoint
  • AI can help with growing by making sure greenhouse conditions are optimal, predicting yield, and more
  • AI can reduce labor needed and become even more important in farming in the future

“With help of modern technology in farming we are able to cut down dependency on man labour by upto 1/3th of that is required by traditional farmers.”

Read more: https://krishijagran.com/interviews/simply-fresh-modern-agri-tech-start-up-propagating-hydroponic-farming/

The COVID-19 pandemic has shed light on our global food supply chain, especially on remote islands like Hawaii. The state imports 90% of all of its food, and with shutdowns, locals were left with shortages. But, there is hope as local organizations are discovering new ways for Hawaii’s agriculture to be more sustainable. They have created online farmers markets and produce delivery services to support local farmers, as well as allocation funds to make it less expensive for farmers to sell their produce.

Key Takeaways:

  • Hawaii farmers have been hit extremely hard due to shut downs, and each of the 7300 farms in Hawaii have been impacted.
  • Hawaii is working on getting consumers to consume the food that farmers have been creating locally.
  • Hawaii has used an online farmers market to boost sales during the pandemic, and online deliveries have boosted their income.

“Hawaii imports about 90 percent of its food and the COVID-19 pandemic showed how vulnerable the state’s food supply is.”

Read more: https://www.kitv.com/story/42219425/hawaii-farmers-offer-sustainable-option-to-imports-and-road-to-food-security

A company called Concrete Valley in the Netherlands is building affordable and efficient floating homes. These homes will be manufactured on top of a water way which will allow the homes to be built at the factory and sent via water to their destination. These homes use the water underneath as a way to efficiently cool or heat the home. They also come equipped with solar panels. These are made to be future proof against climate change.

Key Takeaways:

  • Architects have designed green, floating homes to withstand the potential effects of climate change.
  • The home’s design itself is extremely affordable as it is able to adapt to changing conditions and doesn’t rely on a plot of land.
  • The homes themselves will be powered by solar panels on the upper level, and the lower levels will be able to gather drinking water.

“The floating homes will be made on an assembly line, creating a modular final product from several standardized pieces.”

Read more: https://www.businessinsider.com/grimshaw-floating-tiny-home-concept-sustainable-and-off-grid-2020-6

The COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on the global food supply chain. Although, this crisis has birthed new opportunity for tech companies to revolutionize the agriculture industry. The vertical farming industry is expected to exponentially grow over the next few years, and firms AgFunder has raised nearly $20-billion for the industry. These methods produce higher crop yields, are better for the environment, promote beneficial biodiversity, and are more sustainable in the long-run. With the integration of new technology like artificial intelligence, vertical farming may also be much more cost-effective and efficient.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Covid-19 pandemic has highlighted that we may experience issues in terms of food scarcity and we cannot ignore them.
  • Many countries are expecting a large number of agriculture workers to not show up this year due to the pandemic.
  • The food technology sector raised $20 billion in venture capital in 2019, and vertical farming investment is rising rapidly to address food shortages.

“Due to the dry climate, about 40% of cropped area in the region requires irrigation.”

Read more: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/351562

South Korea is attempting to transform agriculture production. Nine new greenhouses were created to help South Korea achieve this. $2.43 million was raised between the government and private enterprise for the efforts. Bell peppers, strawberries and tomatoes have been made at the greenhouses via hydroponic farming. Hydroponic farming allows individuals to grow more food faster and in higher quantities. Urban gardening and community farming could rise due to hydroponic farming. The biggest challenge will be for people to adapt and become comfortable with hydroponic farming.

Key Takeaways:

  • Nine large greenhouses were constructed at the regional office compound in Guisad, Baguio City last year.
  • The greenhouses have been used to grow tomatoes and, more recently, bell peppers and strawberries through hydroponics farming.
  • Hydroponics lets you grow plants naturally, drawing nutrients from containers or tanks filled with nutrient-rich solutions.

“Since 2018, the project trained three batches of farmers from the Cordillera on greenhouse hydroponics farming.”

Read more: https://www.sunstar.com.ph/article/1860252/Baguio/Opinion/Domoguen-Hydroponic-farming-the-way-forward-for-highland-agriculture

Growing an indoor herb garden is a great way to spice up any of your cooking endeavors. Luckily, most common herbs thrive indoors as long as they have proper water, nutrients, and sunlight from a window. Some common herbs people grow indoors are basil for pesto dishes, cilantro for salsa, and even chives for baked potatoes. The best container for cultivating herbs is a 10-inch pot with normal potting soil, but it’s best to understand the needs of each specific herb before planting.

Key Takeaways:

  • Since people are home more often because of coronavirus, they are experimenting with many different spices and herbs.
  • Its more cost effective to grow herbs yourself instead of paying for them at the supermarket. It’s also safer.
  • When planting herbs, it’s important to do research on them before hand to find out how much each specific plant needs with regards to water and soil.

“There are other reasons to grow herbs, including the simple joy of growing your own and knowing where your food comes from. And, of course, there’s the price tag.”

Read more: https://www.miragenews.com/from-pot-to-table-easy-indoor-herbs-spice-up-cooking/