Organic soil companies have levied a law suit against various companies for using the word “organic”. The law suit did not mention any hydroponic growing company by name. Even with this fact, hydroponic growing companies are publicly speaking about their use of the term organic. Currently hydroponic growing companies can use the organic seal on their packaging. The National Organics Standard Board voted to reject that ability in the future. This is because they think it goes against the purpose of organic in improving soil health.

Key Takeaways:

  • Perdue allows hydroponic growers to use the USDA organic seal, and Perdue gets advice from the National Organic Standards Board.
  • The CSO claims that the legal complaint contains misleading information about the prohibited practices.
  • The CSO claims that the Center for Food Safety is trying to limit competition.

“Hydroponics grows plants in water using specific mineral nutrient solutions, not soil.”

Read more: https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2020/03/hydroponic-growers-defend-their-use-of-organic-label-from-outside-the-courtroom/

The Green Fund at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh allows for students to suggest and submit ideas that will change campus directives to become more sustainable. The fund allocated $60,000 to these student projects, which typically allow for several different projects per year. The projects themselves can deal with the university’s environmental impact, or just a simple landscape change. An example of one project completed through the Green Fund was the implementation of bike repair stations across campus.

Key Takeaways:

  • Green Fund projects can be anything related to sustainability and include things from social justice to the environment.
  • Any student or student group can send a proposal and the proposal will be reviewed for approval.
  • The Green Fund doesn’t focus only on mainstream ideas, but it focuses on anything that can make UWO more sustainable.

“Each year, the Green Fund has $60,000 to spend on student-driven projects to create a more sustainable campus. Not every project has to use all of it though; it leaves room for several proposals to be approved each semester.”

Read more: https://advancetitan.com/news/2020/03/11/uw-oshkosh-green-fund-promotes-sustainable-student-projects

Trafalgar has plans to invest in hydroponic vertical farming. Trafalgar will maintain its’ current investments as well. The company has had challenges investing in the assisted living sector. Delays to building programs have hindered the residential division, along with a lack of activity in that market for the companies’ units. As a result, the board as looked for other opportunities to widen their portfolio. It has found that hydroponic food production is a great area to target investment.

Key Takeaways:

  • The British property group, Trafalgar, is creating an additional business unit that will function right alongside the original company.
  • This new Trafalgar entity will invest in the vertical hydroponic farming sector.
  • One area in which the British property group has experienced financial difficulties is the assisted living sector.

“The residential division has experienced delays to building programmes, combined with a lack of activity in the market for the company’s units.”

Read more: https://www.hortidaily.com/article/9198634/british-property-group-diversifies-into-hydroponic-vertical-farming/

Climate change impacts all of us, but it especially affects those that are in the business of agriculture. Climate change is a threat to the health of fruits and vegetables as well as the soil, the change in climate keeps evolving. Farmers are accustomed to change and can normally adjust to it, but the way it’s going is a huge threat to the health of the soil. A lot of farmers are discovering ways to improve the health of the soil where the foods can grow.

Key Takeaways:

  • Of all the various industries that impact climate change and are highly impacted by it, the agricultural sector is right at the front lines.
  • Farmers as a group tend to believe that moving towards creating a family-friendly affordable sustainable food supply is a major step in fighting climate change.
  • Part of this process of moving towards sustainability includes improving soil health and organic soil matter.

“We must act now to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, change to a renewable energy system and advance a multitude of solutions, including the unique and important climate solutions offered by agriculture.”

Read more: https://peoplesworld.org/article/farmers-say-fight-climate-change-by-investing-in-sustainable-family-agriculture/

The United States Department of Agriculture is on the defense from a lawsuit from the Center for Food Safety and other organic farmers over the agency’s decision regarding hydroponic operations. The organization of farmers and Center initially requested a petition on the agency’s stance towards organic claims in the hydroponic growing industry. The USDA’s denial of the petition has made this lawsuit inevitable. The loose organization of farmers and the Center for Food Safety filed the lawsuit in federal court in March.

Key Takeaways:

  • The ongoing battle over the organic label proving applicable to hydroponics is expected to heat up at the next National Organic Standards Board meeting.
  • Leaders at the U.S. Department of Agriculture are busily assuring that supply support will continue on an ongoing basis.
  • The European Union has had its Green Deal timing thrown awry due to the worldwide ongoing pandemic crisis.

“Organic farmers and the Center for Food Safety (CFS) have gone to court to challenge USDA’s decision to deny a petition calling for the agency to stop hydroponic operations from making organic claims.”

Read more: https://iegpolicy.agribusinessintelligence.informa.com/PL223233/USDA-hit-with-lawsuit-over-organic-certification-of-hydroponics

Growing outdoors exposes you to all the elements, they’re all the elements that you need to grow, but you are at the mercy of mother nature, and mother nature doesn’t always cooperate. Some of the elements that are outdoors can actually harm your growth experience. Indoors is where a lot of growers are turning because you have more control over the environment this way. There are some good and useful tents out there that you can use to give yourself all the room to grow that you need.

Key Takeaways:

  • The VIVOSUN Horticulture is a great tent because it is very tall and can hold up to 12 mature plants at a time. It also comes with a 2 year warranty.
  • SUNCOO has a great tent for new growers as it doesn’t take up a lot of space and has great ventilation.
  • If you are looking for reflectivity then the best tent to get is the Yield Lab Reflective Grow Tent as it has a shape that allows for even distribution of light.

“With no way to regulate the weather and light conditions, growing outside means you’re at the mercy of mother nature.”

Read more: https://www.weednews.co/best-grow-tents/

Sustainability matters when it comes to protecting and preserving the environment. Lately, the idea of recycled materials being turned into fashion items is becoming increasingly more popular. There is a new pair of shoes out there that is made from recycled plastic bottles. There are more than enough plastic bottles to go around so it doesn’t get anymore sustainable than this. Not only do these shoes help the environment, but one dollar gets donated for every pair of shoes that is purchased.

Key Takeaways:

  • Blowfish Malibu is offering a donation to sustainability movements with the purchase of its footwear.
  • The Adidas Outdoor Free Hiker Parley is made from recycled ocean plastic
  • Other brands are embracing sustainability, and incorporating recycling into their products and campaigns.

“The eco-friendly look — made with recycled Parley ocean plastic — was created with all-day comfort in mind, featuring Adidas’ plush Boost cushioning.”

Read more: https://footwearnews.com/2020/business/sustainability/fashion-industry-sustainability-eco-friendly-news-march-2020-1202941256/

Jeremy Croke doesn’t just look for sustainability options as a profession, for him it’s a way of life. Water is among the most precious of resources, and we have to sustain that as much as possible. He wants to provide customer service for places that are looking to conserve water and other resources as a means of helping and he wants to see how well his efforts are doing by seeing what a difference his efforts have made for him and others.

Key Takeaways:

  • Jeremy Croke has a strong personal and professional history of sustainability.
  • Croke has degrees from St. Edward’s University in marketing and environmental policy.
  • Jeremy Croke helped the University of Austin reduce its water usage by 70%.

“Croke will be providing technical sales support to a part of the U.S. where growing water concerns present new challenges for city planners, environmental architects, and others who need to carefully manage water use as populations grow. In Texas, nearly nine million acre-feet of additional water will be required by 2070 to meet the state’s needs, according to the Texas Water Development Board.”

Read more: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/jeremy-croke-joins-calsense-eye-203000339.html

March Fourth is the first even engineering day that is built around sustainability. There has never been an event like this but it is the responsible thing to do in order to further preserve the environment and to try and be as carbon neutral as possible. The first changes have to occur within the engineers circle. The better and broader the engineers are the better, it will create more of an environmentally friendly production and will be better at handling brush fires.

Key Takeaways:

  • Engineers play a very important role in creating sustainable and secure communities in Australia and all around the world for that matter.
  • World Engineering Day has put the spotlight on 10 women who are becoming leaders in engineering and will speak about why diversity is so important.
  • The United Nations has given out 17 goals for the world which include gender equality, climate control and water and sanitation improvements.

“Engineers also have a crucial role to play in driving a lower carbon future, as well as mitigating and adapting to the effects of our changing climate with solutions for our communities.”

Read more: https://www.createdigital.org.au/welcoming-the-world-engineering-day-for-sustainable-development/

There is a very popular company in Mumbai that is run by a woman who started out small but is now dressing some of the most popular celebrities in the industry. She can’t help but want to address climate change by turning her clothing line into a more sustainable business by using sustainable materials. This carbon neutral idea may seem daunting but it won’t be the first challenge that has been over come by her in a male dominated industry.

Key Takeaways:

  • Anita Dongre is a fashion designer who is focused on creating an environmentally sustainable fashion company.
  • She created a foundation that provides training and jobs to over 250 rural woman with the plan to cover about 30 villages by the year 2025.
  • Dongre has said that a company cannot only be driven by profit, and that she sacrifices some profits in order to create an environmentally responsible workplace.

“When she started her business aged 23, armed with two sewing machines and a staff of two male tailors perched on the balcony of the bedroom she shared with her sisters, she was the first woman in her conservative family to work.”

Read more: https://www.straitstimes.com/lifestyle/fashion/fighting-for-sustainable-fashion